Why Was It OK for Ukraine to Break Away from the USSR, but Not for Crimea to Break Away from Ukraine? | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED X-Frame-Options: DENY X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN

Why Was It OK for Ukraine to Break Away from the USSR, but Not for Crimea to Break Away from Ukraine?

All right, I admit it, it’s not that brief. I didn’t have time to shorten it. But what follows is a condensed history of the argument about who should control Crimea, one which still rages and which (as usual) is not as simple as politicians like to claim it is.

I’ll begin with a question:

What do you reckon is the date of the following Reuters News Agency dispatch? I’ve slightly doctored one or two things in it, but only to conceal the date.

‘Elected officials in the Crimea voted on Monday to hold a referendum to resolve heated debates on the future status of the region.

‘A Moscow news agency said the regional council voted to issue a declaration restoring the Crimea’s “statehood” and also to hold a vote to determine the future of the attractive peninsula on the shores of the Black Sea.

‘Moscow television suggested the referendum could take place early next February. It said the region, part of the Ukraine but with a large population of ethnic Russians and other groups, was sharply divided between maintaining its present status or rejoining the Russian Federation.’

Well, it was 12th November 1990, more than 30 years ago. And it forms the opening page in a fascinating file compiled for me, entirely from Western sources, by a friend and colleague in Moscow.

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