It was a milestone for Mexico’s democracy. Now López Obrador wants to get rid of the country’s freedom of information institute. | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN

It was a milestone for Mexico’s democracy. Now López Obrador wants to get rid of the country’s freedom of information institute.

One scandal featured the president's wife and a $7 million mansion built by a top government contractor. Another involved the misuse of federal AIDS funds to buy Cartier pens and women's underwear. Then there was the "Master Fraud," in which $400 million flowed between 11 government agencies, eight universities and dozens of phony companies — with half disappearing.

Each of the cases was exposed thanks to Mexico’s freedom of information system, often ranked among the world’s most effective. Created in 2002, it has allowed journalists and researchers to wrest documents from a government long known for opacity.

The system has been “one of the most important democratic advances in Mexico” since the end of one-party rule in 2000, said Roberto Rock, a journalist who lobbied for its creation.

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