POLICE IN CANADA ARE TRACKING PEOPLE’S ‘NEGATIVE’ BEHAVIOR IN A ‘RISK' DATABASE | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

POLICE IN CANADA ARE TRACKING PEOPLE’S ‘NEGATIVE’ BEHAVIOR IN A ‘RISK' DATABASE

Police, social services, and health workers in Canada are using shared databases to track the behaviour of vulnerable people—including minors and people experiencing homelessness—with little oversight and often without consent.

Documents obtained by Motherboard from Ontario’s Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services (MCSCS) through an access to information request show that at least two provinces—Ontario and Saskatchewan—maintain a “Risk-driven Tracking Database” that is used to amass highly sensitive information about people’s lives. Information in the database includes whether a person uses drugs, has been the victim of an assault, or lives in a “negative neighborhood.”

The Risk-driven Tracking Database (RTD) is part of a collaborative approach to policing called the Hub model that partners cops, school staff, social workers, health care workers, and the provincial government.

Information about people believed to be “at risk” of becoming criminals or victims of harm is shared between civilian agencies and police and is added to the database when a person is being evaluated for a rapid intervention intended to lower their risk levels. Interventions can range from a door knock and a chat to forced hospitalization or arrest.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

This makes me very worried about Canadians who may be "targeted" by people with an axe to grind, turning in their neighbors just out of spite or contempt.

I wonder who has the job of "looking after" Christian pacifist activists, who are completely against war as an immoral way of resolving international situations, and look to document the truth as they see it.

Comments

SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA