Obama passing new law to allow searching of PC's, Laptops, and media devices | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


Obama passing new law to allow searching of PC's, Laptops, and media devices

Webmaster's Commentary: 

"Iss your mp3 player in order, schwine?!?"

Folks, here is the answer to the current copyright and copying issue.

1. Learn a musical instrument.

2. Write your own music.

3. Feel free to give it away.

I am not being smug here. One of the downsides of modern digital players is that fewer and fewer people learn to play musical instruments or to create their own music.

Playing a musical instrument is great exercise for your brain. Writing your own music means not having to be slaves to the thoughts of the corporate-owned lyrics. And since you own the music, you can do what you want with it, including giving away copies.

Being a content creator myself, I empathize with the holders of copyrights with regard to the file copying problem. But given the terror-tactics of the RIAA/MPAA and this new invasive attitude by the government, I an seriously disinclined to purchase any more commercial content and ready to toss all my digital players into the trash.

Silence can indeed be golden. If the government intends to make commercial entertainment too complicated and difficult to use, let us all agree to stop using it.

On a purely practical point, the latest iPhone has a 32 Gig memory. Some of the high end digital players go even higher. Are they really planning to slow down the airport lines even further by doing a 15 minute download on every single media player going through the gate?

Second practical point; Who pays for all this protection for the record and movie industry? The movie and music industries won't want to bear the costs because that would raise the price of product and further erode sales already in dire trouble from the declining economy. So the taxpayers will get screwed for this as well, which means WE THE PEOPLE will have even less money to spend for pleasures like music, which means record and film sales are still going to go down anyway because of this, but the record and movie companies will refuse to see that their draconian solutions are only accelerating the problem.

Third practical point; MP3 players are cheap these days. Just as I have a cheap laptop to travel with (since TSA destroyed a really expensive one a while back) those who are into pirated content will have a cheap MP3 player in their pockets when they go through security checkpoints while their "real" players are hidden somewhere else. Many smart phones that double as media players have removable memory cards. How hard is it to conceal one of those tiny gigabyte chips?

Fourth practical point; How does a scan of our media players know if the content is legally owned or not? Downloaded content has a DRM license tag on it, but what of music transferred from a legally-owned CD into the player; a feature supported by every current playing system. There is no way to know if the CD sitting in that drive is an original disk or not.

Fifth practical point; what if the MP3 player is borrowed, bought at a yard sale, a hand me down, or shared among multiple users in the family? Reasonable doubt exists that any one user of the device is the "criminal."

As scary as this new law sounds, it is on a practical level just flat out not enforceable.

In the end, content theft, like any crime, is a moral issue. All populations inherit the moral qualities of their leaders. In a nation where the government is stealing other nations' wealth, it is hard to convince kids that copying a file is any big deal.

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