Britain admits OPCW did not confirm ‘essential evidence’ on origin of Skripal poison | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


Britain admits OPCW did not confirm ‘essential evidence’ on origin of Skripal poison

The British delegation to the OPCW has admitted that international chemical weapons inspectors did not confirm the origin of the nerve agent used in the Salisbury ex-spy poisoning.
The UK’s representative to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), Peter Wilson, said identifying the nerve agent is an “essential part of the investigation,” and that the OPCW has identified neither its origin nor the laboratory where it was produced.

"But of course, while the identification of the nerve agent used is an essential piece of technical evidence in our investigation, neither DSTL’s analysis, nor the OPCW’s report, identifies the country or laboratory of origin of the agent used in this attack," he said.

The British government claims a Soviet-era nerve agent that has become known as Novichok was used against Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia and accused Russia of producing and deploying it.

However, the claims of Russian involvement have not been backed up by either Britain’s own scientists at the Porton Down laboratories or the OPCW, both of which say it’s not their job to apportion blame or identify the origin, but only the type of substance involved.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Translation: Prime Minister May lied about this, to demonize Russia, when those lies could not be backed up by solid research.

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