Congress, White House Reaching Breaking Point On Yemen? | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Congress, White House Reaching Breaking Point On Yemen?

Soon after a Saudi-led coalition strike on a bus killed 40 children on August 9, a CENTCOM spokesperson stated to Vox, “We may never know if the munition [used] was one that the U.S. sold to them.” This feigned ignorance is particularly fatiguing. CENTCOM commander General Joseph Votel professed the same know-nothingness in March when he told Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing that CENTCOM cannot track whether coalition missions burning US fuel and firing US munitions are responsible for strikes against civilians.

Congressional offices are expressing a certain weariness of their own with these evasions. On August 14, Warren published a letter to the general asking him to clarify the discrepancy between his sworn testimony and recent reporting from Iona Craig and Shuaib Almosawa in The Intercept. Craig and Almosawa revealed that the United States has, at least once, conducted an assessment of a coalition airstrike that targeted civilians with a U.S.-manufactured precision-guided munition. Warren’s questions are numerous, and their subtext is unmistakable: if you misled me during the hearing, what else have you been misleading Congress about?

Warren’s letter is another sign of escalating tension between Congress and the administration concerning U.S. support for coalition war crimes in Yemen. For now, high-profile legislative challenges and unprecedented anti-war legislation have given way to a barrage of public letters and statements against the conflict, as offices opposed to the intervention seek to build their sizable minorities into majorities. These statements are gaining traction among increasingly conservative, and even hawkish, members of Congress. The administration is meeting this opposition with belligerence and a further emphasis on unconditional U.S. support for the coalition. This tension could soon build to a needed congressional repudiation of U.S. military engagement in Yemen’s civil war, the one action that may finally force coalition members to curtail their civilian targeting and redress violations of international humanitarian law.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The war in Yemen is ANYTHING but a civil war; Saudi Arabia has attempted, with US enabling, to put down the Houthi rebellion for over 3 years now, with precious little success.

And the steerable bomb, used in this assassination of children, was supplied by the US. Jim Carrey got it right with his cartoon:

Jim Carrey Takes Aim at Yemen School Bus Bombing as Crime of US.

Here is the image of packaging for the bomb:

Bomb that killed 40 children in Yemen was supplied by the US

But you see, this isn't the first time children have been assassinated in Yemen, courtesy of US bombs, used by the Saudis in Yemen, using US "guidance", or mid-air refueling: and I warn you; the images are very graphic.

Images: Yemeni children assassinated by Saudi bombing runs.

Congress should show some collective "male attributes" and repudiate the use of US forces or weaons for these actions; but chances are, President Trump being President Trump, that Congress will be over-ridden by an Executive Order, continuing these practices.

After all, Trump's two BFFs in the Middle East are the Butcher of Yemen (Saudi Arabia's Prince Bin Salman), and the Butcher of Gaza, Prime Minister Netanyahu. There is something about the sheer raw power necessary to order people assassinated which fascinates, and attracts, this President.

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