ALIS through the looking glass: F-35 fighter jet's slurpware nearly made buyers pull out – report | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

ALIS through the looking glass: F-35 fighter jet's slurpware nearly made buyers pull out – report

The F-35 fighter jet project has been hit by yet another set of controversies including a kerfuffle over US data-slurping, flight control problems and its stealth coating melting at supersonic speeds.

Once described by The Register as the ultimate vendor lock-in project, the F-35 is sold by Lockheed Martin as a package: not only do you buy the jets and their associated spares and training packages, you also buy its Autonomous Logistics Information System (ALIS).

ALIS is a spares and training management package. It tracks the state of the aeroplanes themselves, interfaces with onboard diagnostic systems to check system and component health, and orders spare parts as and when needed. As you can imagine, having access to ALIS gives you an instant and incredibly detailed picture of whether an F-35 squadron is capable of flying and fighting – or not.

Naturally, some countries buying the F-35 aren't happy about this.

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